Making more Pelargonium plants: How to take Pelargonium cuttings

Making more Pelargonium plants: How to take Pelargonium cuttings.Pelargonium cuttings, pelargonium, geranium, cuttings, plant propagation, plant, plants, gardening, greenhouse, terracotta pot, gravel, mulch, garden blog, gardening blog, gardening

Making more Pelargonium plants: How to take Pelargonium cuttings

As part of the new houseplants that I have recently taken on, one was a white Pelargonium, which needed some TLC. It came out of its pot with not much by way of roots. I’m not sure how well this will cope, or even survive, with this transplant. So, I have taken some cuttings in order to increase my chance of keeping this plant alive.

Pelargonium cuttings, pelargonium, geranium, cuttings, plant propagation, plant, plants, gardening, greenhouse, terracotta pot, gravel, mulch, garden blog, gardening blog, gardening
The original white pelargonium plant

Pelargoniums

There’s a lot of confusion about the naming, or nomenclature, of Pelargoniums. They are commonly called Geraniums, partly because they do belong to the Geraniaceae family, but also because of some confusion when they were brought to the UK. Apparently, one plant writer used the incorrect term and was more famous than the chap who was doing it correctly. What’s silly is that the true Geraniums get called ‘Hardy Geraniums’.

The Geraniums I’m talking about are the Pelargoniums, which come from South Africa, and are frost-tender and have a more succulent appearance.

Taking Pelargonium Cuttings

I chose some short side-shoots from the main plant for my cuttings material. The standard advice with all succulent cutting material is to allow it to dry and slightly callus before putting it into the potting media. This way there is less chance of the cutting rotting before it has the chance to root. The other difference from standard soft wood or semi-ripe cuttings is that you don’t enclose the tops in a plastic bag to increase humidity. The extra humidity can also cause the cuttings to rot so they are instead left out and dry.

I cut below a node, strip excess leaves from the stem, and remove large leaves to reduce water loss. Then I leave them to sit on a dry bench to callus.

Pelargonium cuttings, pelargonium, geranium, cuttings, plant propagation, plant, plants, gardening, greenhouse, terracotta pot, gravel, mulch, garden blog, gardening blog, gardening
Small pelargonium cuttings

The first time I took pelargonium cuttings I did enclose them in a plastic bag and didn’t leave them time to callus. They took anyway, which was probably luck, but just goes to show how keen they are to take.

Aftercare of Pelargonium Cuttings

Once you’ve taken the cuttings, and they’ve had some time to dry a little at the ends, put them in a gritty potting mix. I have some new (old) terracotta pots that I find work really well for cuttings. You don’t need terracotta pots, however, as cuttings will work in most containers. Where excess moisture is particularly dangerous to cuttings, exactly like it is to Pelargonium cuttings and other succulent cuttings, the porous nature of the terracotta helps.

Pelargonium cuttings, pelargonium, geranium, cuttings, plant propagation, plant, plants, gardening, greenhouse, terracotta pot, gravel, mulch, garden blog, gardening blog, gardening
Pelargonium cuttings in a gravel mix

I water them in and then leave them in a bright, dry area of the greenhouse. It will take a couple of weeks for them to root. I wait until there are plenty of roots coming from the bottom of the pot and some sign of new growth before potting on. If space is tight you can leave them, rooted, in the pots over winter before potting on in Spring.

How to take Basil Cuttings

Other cuttings taken recently

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,

Garden Update 12th August 2017

It would be nice to be able to say something other than how wet things have been. We’ve had another damp week in Devon (well the green rolling hills don’t get that way without some of the wet stuff).

We’ve been helping to clear out an elderly relative’s home this week so I’ve had a few new additions to the house and garden. It’s nice to re-home plants and items that have been well used and give them some new life. There’s nothing worse than landfill!

The house is now home to more African Violet Plants that need some TLC. A new Moth Orchid, a Maidenhair fern and a Fig plant. We have new (old) terracotta pots and a new (old) trowel and hand fork. I’ve rescued a white Pelargonium and taken some cuttings from it. I hope they all thrive in their new home.

Previous Updates

Garden Update 5th August

Garden Update 29th July

Allotment Update

Not much to report from the allotment this week. I haven’t had a great deal of time to get up there as we’ve had family visiting.

Greenhouse Update

Even though light levels haven’t been great and temperatures have cooled, we still have some progress in the greenhouse. The seeds of Geranium phaem ‘alba’ have germinated and I now have one little seedling. The plant was a bit tight with viable seed so it’s going to be a slow job to bulk up the numbers.

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Geranium phaem ‘alba’
Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Pak Choi seedlings
Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Winter greens – Lettuce and Chard

My plug trays of winter greens have germinated well and been thinned to one plant per module. These are on a high shelf in the greenhouse for maximum light so they don’t get too leggy but it does mean it’s harder to keep track of the watering. I took these photos on tiptoes. These were well watered soon after taking.

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Teucrium cuttings (label spelled incorrectly)

I’m pleased with how well the Teucrium cuttings have taken. I’m hoping for some mass planting of these in the Far Garden.

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Stipa tenuissima seedlings

Also destined for the Far Garden are some Stipa tenuissima seedlings. They’re hard to photograph due to being quite spindly when they first come up.

Garden Update

Having tried, and then tried again, to get the garden furniture we brought back from Australia to fit in, I think I’ve got a layout I’m happy with. I think you should be able to access all seats without feeling that you’re squeezing past. The set might be a little too big for the space and may not have been purchased over here for that reason. Now it’s in place I like it. I just need to ignore the state of the borders.

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Finally rearranged the furniture in the Far Garden

I’m getting little surprises coming up around the garden. I now have 4 small clumps of Japanese Anemones springing up to provide colour and interest later into the season. This garden has always seemed to hit its stride in May and June with nothing coming through for later on.

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Pink Japanese Anemone

Also extending the season of interest are the Hydrangeas. I have three types in the garden; one came from a cutting from my in-law’s garden and the other two were bought to surround us where we got married. The garden where we got married had to remove all the Clary Sage that was planted around the ceremony site leaving bare earth. We bought Hazel trees and Hydrangeas for a simple backdrop and they looked amazing. Our family members all have a tree and some Hydrangea bushes in their gardens too!.

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Hydrangea putting on a pink blush
Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’ in the background

These Holly bushes have always struggled to thrive in their last pot. They put up spindly growth and fruited fine but the plants themselves were always looking dry and unhappy. When repotting them this year I discovered that they still had the plastic pots from the nursery attached! How embarrassing. Needless to say, now they can get their roots out they’re doing much better with healthy new growth. I think they’ll be much denser plants from now on but we’ll see if they still fruit as well.

Garden Update 12th August 2017: Taking on the past. Gardening blog, gardening, UK, Devon, Greenhouse, cottage garden, propagation, cuttings, seeds, seedlings, allotment, allotment blog, grow your own, plants,
Holly Bushes

Garden Update 5th August 2017

Garden Update 5th August 2017

Garden Update 5th August 2017

Another wet week here in Devon and more working days has meant I haven’t done as much as I would like in the garden and allotment. The end of the week was great as I was able to show my lovely gardening aunt my allotment for the first time. She was very excited and I think, if it was up to her, she’d have me presenting Gardeners World immediately. We’ve done the customary plant swap; I have a new Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and she went away with Nepeta, Peppermint and Astrantia.

Previous Updates

Garden Update 29th July

Garden Update 22nd July

Allotment Update

The main addition to the allotment has been a bed of autumn and winter greens. As you can see in the seed sowing spreadsheet, I have 3 varieties of lettuce, 3 chards and 2 pak chois.

I’ve treated myself to a new hoe – the last one disintegrating before my eyes into a bendy metal mess – and I’ve used it to take the tops off the dandelions growing through the de-turfed but uncultivated parts of the allotment. It’s money well spent.

My no-dig experiment continues. You can see the two squashes doing pretty well and of course, there’s no weeding to be done where the landscape fabric is in place. I have had to go around the bed with my new hoe as the dandelions are getting carried away.

Garden Update 5th August 2017
My no-dig experiment with squashes growing well

I’m pleased with the fruit set on the smaller pumpkin. It’s growing into a compact plant (similar to a courgette) and I think it’s the Baby Blue Hubbard.

Garden Update 5th August 2017
pumpkin growing well

Greenhouse Update

I’m trying really hard to get the tomatoes in my greenhouse to ripen. They’ve been hampered by a dip in light levels as it’s been a wet week here in Devon. I put in a banana skin last week but I don’t think it’s achieved much other than attracting some flies.

As well as the direct sowing of chard, lettuce and pak choi at the allotment, I’ve also done some in modules in the greenhouse. This is partly to guard against the inevitable mollusc attacks but also to provide some kind of succession.

In addition to the Penstemon I took last week I now have Phygelius and Lavender cuttings. I’ve also tried my hand at my first root cutting of Eryngium.

Garden Update

I’m really pleased to see the containers at the front of the cottage filling out and doing exactly what I wanted them to do. I’ve taken seeds from the Stipa tenuissima as I want to introduce it to other parts of the garden and I have a few family members also needing some.

The Libertia grandiflora seeds are finally ready so they’ve been sown in a half seed tray. I’m going to collect some Stachys byzantina seeds today to try. The other job for the weekend is to clear the bindweed from the far garden’s left border.

Garden Update 29th July 2017

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/301178293811930806/

Garden Update 29th July 2017

A wet end to the week put paid to much change this week. I’ve had some good harvests from the allotment and the everything is looking lush in the garden.

Previous Updates

Garden Update 22nd July

Garden Update 1st July

Allotment Update

I’ve reached a milestone with the allotment this week as the final delivery on bark has been applied. As you might remember, I didn’t order enough the first time round so only the peripheries were covered.
The idea that the landscape fabric may have been able to stay in the main, central areas was false. It was too thin and too easily broken down by the elements to last any longer so had to be covered.
The plot is looking much tidier now and I can really focus on the planting borders. I’m hoping that is the end of the hard landscaping for a while.

I’m getting the sense of a building momentum in the harvesting from the allotment. It’s not been a hugely productive space so far. A dry summer and a late start has hampered things this year. Things are improving though; this week I have had another cucumber, a large box of mangetout and yellow courgettes.

An easy bonus crop is this Anemone de Cain. I am hoping to have more cut flowers to add to the edible harvest. These bulbs came from an impulse purchase from a well-known DIY store when buying paint for the house. They were cheap, having been reduced, and very cheerful.

Greenhouse Update

Most of the work in the greenhouse this week has been taking and managing cuttings. The newest addition has been a tray of Penstemon ‘Blackbird’ cuttings. I have had this variety for more than 6 years but it seems to have disappeared from this garden. I have taken cuttings from a plant that I gave to my aunt. I’m looking forward to reintroducing it soon.

My Teucrium cuttings seem to have taken which is very exciting. The basil, nepeta, peppermint, and oregano cuttings all look to be doing well in their own pots.

I have some large tomatoes developing but they’re not showing any sign of colour. I’ve thrown a ripe banana in with them to get them to ripen.

Garden Update

Not much has changed in the garden. After my tidy-up last week I’ve put some squash plants to cover the bare earth for the time being.

I need to make a decision about what to do with the overgrown Lleylandii hedge at the far end of the garden. My options are a light prune to square it off (not ideal as that will leave a huge area of encroachment in a small space) or get tough with it and cut it back to the boundary (leaving an unsightly mess).

I’ve had the idea of installing a pleached Beech hedge to hide the bare stems of the conifer. It should like the drier conditions of that far border.

I’m thinking of something like this found on Pinterest;

Containers at the front of the Cottage

Containers at the front of the Cottage

Two agricultural feeding containers are the main planting interest at the front of the cottage

This year is all about reclaiming my garden from the weed wonderland out the back and the barren, baked wasteland at the front. As I’ve previously described, I have been taking stock of what has survived two years of tenants and reclaiming ground from the onslaught of new weeds. This week I am doing an update on the front of the cottage.

An overview of the cottage’s garden areas

A big clear-out in the far garden

Getting control and structure sorted in the immediate garden

What I returned home to

MyPottingBenchBlog returns home
Looking up the lane

As there is no earth at the front of the cottage, I installed two agricultural feeding troughs to be a simple but vernacularly correct addition to the front of the cottage. These get baked in the sun and have to cope with more breeze than round the back of the cottage. There’s a suffering clematis left over from the previous owners in a planter that looks to have given up the struggle.

MyPottingBenchBlog returns home
Right of the front door

We returned to find that the young wisteria has succumbed and some annual weeds were installed. Mostly though this area was the best of the bunch in terms of jobs to be done.

Giving the containers a freshen up

The goal for these planters was to have a slightly wild grass planting scheme which would cope, or even better, thrive in the drier and windier conditions. They would also look good through winter and wouldn’t need too much maintenance. The two main living areas of the house look out of these windows on to the lane, and by extension, can be looked in on from the lane. I wanted the planters to be sufficiently visually interesting to draw the eye away from whatever was happening inside the house and to form a light screening for us looking out. Importantly, I didn’t want to block any light.

Containers at the front of the Cottage
A teucrium in a terracotta pot beside one container
Containers at the front of the Cottage
Hebe, iris and grasses
Containers at the front of the Cottage
Salvia and stipa

Plant List

Stipa tenuissima

Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foester’

Salvia x sylvestris ‘Rose Queen’

Hebe (unknown variety)

Euphorbia myrsinites

Rose ‘Moody  Blue’

Teucrium (unknown variety)

Iris (unknown variety)

Physalis alkekengi

Plans for the front of the cottage

I’m going to source a climbing rose to replace the clematis. I think the pot it’s in is too small. The roots are getting too hot and dry for it to ever thrive. We’re still deciding on a colour (and may paint the cottage a different colour so that has to be decided before I can purchase anything). I think we’ll get another metal planter to match the two large ones as I think a third type of container would be too much visually.

Garden Update 22nd July 2017: Courgettes, cuttings and a Leaf-cutter Bee

Garden Update 22nd July 2017

The rain at the end of this week is very welcomed at the allotment. I’m hoping the second batch of carrots and beetroot that I sowed this week will get a better start than the last lot. The garden had a leaf-cutter bee visit which was very exciting.

Previous Updates

Garden Update 1st July

Garden Update 24th June 2017

Allotment Update

I’m pleased to have some harvests coming from the allotment, as modest as they are to date, and I’m hoping for more over the next few weeks. The black landscape fabric has started to disintegrate so I’ve bitten the bullet and ordered some more bark to finish the job.

I’ve been strolling up to the plot with my daughter and dog in the evening. The small bags of mange tout and courgettes add a little to our evening meals.

Greenhouse Update

This part of the year there’s room on the potting bench for some more sowing. The early part of the year a rush for the first batches of edibles but I find I hit a lull from now onwards. Traditionally I use the time and space to get some perennials started, be it by seed or cuttings, as well as some successional sowings of salad.

This week I’ve tried to start off some more Stipa tenuissima, a double poppy found on a wall, and some Nicotiana elata. I’ve taken cuttings of the Hydrangia paniculata and a pink rose at my mums. There’s also a half-seed-tray of mixed lettuce.

Garden Update

The worst thing about leaving the garden in the hands of someone else for 2 years is the accumulation of new perennial weeds. The main issue to come back after the last clear out has been the bind weed.

This border has been left due to the construction of a new shed along the boundary. This has been a good thing as I hadn’t fully appreciated the extent of the problem. I’m still planning the rejuvenation of this border but there’s no point putting anything in if there are weed roots lurking under the soil. I’ve dug up the plants in the worst of the bindweed area, rinsed their roots, and repotted in isolation to make sure they’re clean. All the bindweed roots have been dug up and I think I’ll put some squash and cucumber plants in so if there’s bindweed left behind at least it’s only an annual planting and can be dug up over winter.

Garden Update 22nd July 2017: Courgettes, cuttings and a Leaf-cutter Bee
The right border in the far garden

There’s been a lot of insect activity in the warm weather. I captured this leaf-cutter bee taking bites out of my Gertrude Jekyll rose.

Cheap and cheerful – how to create more basil plants using water cuttings 

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings

A simple way to take basil cuttings to make new plants for free

I have a terrible record when it comes to growing basil from seeds so I was really intrigued to hear about taking cuttings from plants to create more. I can’t believe it’s never occurred to me before to take basil cuttings. Usually, I cheat by buying a plant in a supermarket, with multiple elongated seedlings crammed together, and try to divide and plant these out. This has given me a small amount of success if I can harvest the leaves before the slugs get them.

I was listening to a recent podcast episode of Still Growing and was inspired to try basil cuttings myself.

How to take basil cuttings

The vigorous growth on basil is perfect for softwood cuttings. I took lengths of stem around 2-3 inches long and removed the lower leaves. Cutting under a node (where the leaves were emerging from the stem) encourages roots to develop at a point where the hormones are concentrated. The very softest growth at the top of the cutting was pinched out.

The leaves and tips that I stripped off were used in a pasta dish so no wastage.

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings
Basil cuttings in water

Since basil is related closely to mint it should root as easily as mint. At the same time as I took the basil cuttings I also took Peppermint and Sweet Potato. These were placed into small glasses somewhere sheltered, out of direct sunlight. The downstairs toilet windowsill is perfect. An unexpected bonus is the aromatic wafts you get from the basil and peppermint.

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings
Basil, Sweet Potato and Peppermint cuttings

Waiting for roots on my basil cuttings

The Sweet Potato and Peppermint definitely won the root race and had grown some adventitious roots within 4 days. I had to wait a long 10 days to see some action on the basil.

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings
Roots showing after 10 days

Potting on basil cuttings

Once there was a good amount of root on each basil cutting, and when I had time to do it, I potted them on into loose multipurpose compost to establish.

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings
Good amount of root ready for potting up

This was a really easy bit of propagation and was quite successful. A couple of minutes work to prepare the cuttings was all it took to get the process going. One cutting had to be discarded due to rot (It needed to be removed from the water) and I replaced the water twice over the 10 days. That’s it! I’m hoping they’ll establish well so I can pot them on again before starting to harvest.

Garden Update 1st July 2017: Mulch, Rain and Harvest

Screen Shot 2017-07-01 at 09

Garden Update 1st July 2017

Mulch, Rain and Harvest

Making the most of a wet week but mulching the paths at the allotment and starting some seeds and cuttings in the greenhouse.

Previous Updates

Garden Update 24th June 2017

Garden Update: 10th June

Allotment Update

The lightweight landscape fabric isn’t really doing its job, unfortunately. It’s too flimsy to be a long-term surface; there are rips and tears already showing. I don’t think it’s blocking light to the ground as much as it should because the weeds underneath are green and growing strongly (strong enough to lift the fabric 40cm).

So I’ve brought forward the timetable for mulching the paths with bark. I’m hoping the weight of the bark will keep the fabric in place and the extra depth might block some of the light. As usual, I didn’t order enough to cover the space (despite what the online calculator told me) so I’ll need to put my hand in my pocket again sometime to finish the job.

On a positive note I’ve had my first strawberry harvest!

Greenhouse Update

My water cuttings of Basil, Mint and Sweet Potato have been stewing for nearly a week now and there is some progress to be seen with the mint and potato. The basil doesn’t seem to want to play this game and is curling its stalks up and out of the water.

Garden Update 1st July 2017 Mulch, rain and harvest
Peppermint cuttings in water

I’ve been grabbing things from the garden to propagate whenever I’ve had a chance. I have some Cirsium revulare and Camassia leichtlinii seeds ripen so they’ve been thrown into pots and covered with grit to see what comes up.

Garden Update

The Far Garden is looking a little odd at the moment as the neighbour’s shed has been taken down. This provided the back wall for the right border and had a trellis covered with ivy and a climbing rose that was testing my patience. All have now gone and we have direct access to the neighbour’s garden. The extra light and space make the remaining border look like a deer in the headlights. I’m not sure when the replacement will be in place but after that, I can start replanting. The job, for the time being, is to keep on top of the bindweed regrowth.

I’ve had a surprise bloom of a passionflower at the end of the Immediate Garden border. I’d completely forgotten it was living there and it looks like there’s going to be a good show from the blooms.

There’s plenty of light, white planting coming through with the astrantias in full flow, a lone Lilium regale album and the hydrangea starting to join in.

 

 

Garden Update 24th June 2017: Sun, Sun and more Sun

Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 21

Garden Update 24th June 2017: Sun, Sun and more Sun

Last week’s update was replaced by a post on Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. It was nice to join in the larger meme for the week and I felt the topic is similar to these updates so didn’t want to bore you with repeating myself.

Previous Updates

Garden Update: 10th June

Garden Update: 3rd June 

Allotment Update

The lack of rain and extremely hot sunny days has taken its toll on some of the sweetcorn plants. The beans and peas have coped really well and the roots are still just sitting there as small seedlings. I’m hoping they’re biding their time before taking off when the rain comes.

I harvested some blackcurrants – although they’re not very sweet so I may have been too quick to pull them off the plant.

I’ve turned some unfinished bed space into a ‘No-dig’ experiment (I’ll do a post on the construction another time). I thought I’d use the space to see how a couple of squash plants do under the landscape fabric. Since watering is an issue I’ve installed submerged bottles next to the squashes (and the fruit bushes) to reduce evaporation and deliver water straight to the root zone.

Greenhouse Update

My basil plants have provided a great meal to the resident slug population (well they needed something to wash down the kale, romanesco and PSB devoured last week). My mum kindly donated a replacement to be kept up high on a shelf. I was inspired by the Still Growing Podcast during the recent Basilmania episode where she recommended taking cuttings of basil. I am hopeless at getting basil to germinate so I’m hoping this technique will be more successful.

My replacement Kale, Romanesco and Purple Sprouting Brocolli germinated in record quick time of just 2 days!

After my initial disappointment in the size of the germinated New Zealand Spinach seeds, I have completed changed my mind. It turns out that they’re cluster seeds (a little like beetroot but not knobbly) so each seed produces a small handful of seedlings. They’re now potted on into modules to get a little more established before braving the allotment.

 

Garden Update 24th June 2017: Sun, Sun and more Sun
New Zealand Spinach Seedlings

Garden Update

The rejuvenation of the far garden continues. I’ve purchased a Eucalyptus gunnii to bring a feel of Australia to Devon. The bindweed keeps making little bids to re-establish so I’m being vigilant in pulling it out.

I’ve planted out some Stocks for some colour later in summer and there’s a perennial Gerbera to brighten things up.

House Update

Time for a new section to these weekly updates. This weekI became the proud owner of a new houseplant to add to the growing collection happening in our back room, grandly titled the Garden Room, which looks out over the garden.

Having never grown an African Violet before I asked the internet and had some great advice from instagram on how to look after this one.

My poor Peace Lily also became famous this week after being featured on Jane Perrone’s excellent houseplant podcast : On The Ledge.  It’s become very yellowed after being split a couple of months ago and doesn’t look grateful and happy at all. Hearing the options I decided it’s like transplant shock so I’m hoping time and TLC will do the job.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017

Joining a popular garden bloggers meme and sharing the flowers blooming in my garden each month.

Every 15th of the month garden bloggers around the month share what’s happening in their gardens by photographing what’s in flower on their plot on that day. I last joined in this event in April 2014 and thought it might be fun to come out to play again. I’m looking forward to connecting with more garden bloggers through this.

Previous Garden Bloggers Bloom Day posts

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day April 2014

Where it started

Carol at May Dreams Gardens hosts this very popular meme and you can find out more about her blog here.

International Comparisons

With the help of this useful map my garden would be in the USDA plant hardiness Zone 9a.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Astrantia major
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Eryngium planum
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Eryngium yuccifolium

This guy can get to over 6ft in the border – I’ve sown more seeds this year to see if I can get a few more dotted through the sunny border in the far garden.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Stachys byzantina

I love, love, love this plant and I can’t wait for it to produce seeds so I can get a drift going. The leaves feel exactly the same as our chocolate labrador’s ears. He passed away last year and it’s lovely to sit and stroke them.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Rose ‘Gertrude Jekyll’

The best smelling climbing rose; its bright pink (bordering on Barbie) is tolerated for the scent.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Allium christophii
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Astrantia major
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Geranium – unknown variety
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Iris foetidissima

I’ve taken out clumps of this from around the garden as the coarse strap leaves and muddy flowers are easily out-performed with something else in the space.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Rambling rose – unknown variety
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Climbing rose- unknown variety

I know I planted this one 3 years ago but it’s the only rose not to have its label kept in the ‘label bag’.  Lightly scented and closer to the colour pallet we’re aiming for in this part of the garden. It tones down Gertrude Jekyll.

Other UK blogs that get involved

Sarah Shoesmith’s blog for the Hardy Plant Society

Glebe House

The Rusty Duck