Harvest Roundup 2017 – my courgette and climbing bean totals

Quantifying the haul from my yellow courgette and climbing bean harvest for 2017. It’s my first harvest roundup!

You may have seen on my Instagram and Twitter feeds and previous posts that I have been keeping a tally of the amount of harvest collected from some of the crops on my allotment this year. I’ve been nerdily weighing everything that makes it home. This year, for my harvest roundup,  I concentrated on the yellow courgette and my two varieties of climbing bean; Cosse Violette and Trail of Tears.

This was for three main reasons;

  1. I’m a big geek
  2. To see if there was any difference in yields between varieties
  3. To see if I could justify the costs of keeping the allotment

Previously on the allotment

Garden Update 22nd July: Courgettes, cuttings and a Leaf-cutter Bee

No Dig Newbie

Allotment layout ideas

Harvest roundup: Yellow courgette

These plants were sourced from one of my favourite local nurseries, Hill House Nursery in Landscove, Devon. I got my allotment in April/May this year and so it felt like a late start to the season so I cheated with some purchased plants. I’ve lost/forgotten the name so I’ve been calling them ‘yellow courgette’ all year. I also bought a green variety but it’s been pants so hasn’t been worth tallying.

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Yellow courgette

My total harvest haul comes to 1194g!

That’s near on 1.2kg from 2 plants. Not bad considering it was a dry start to the year.

I quick look at our nearest supermarket has standard green courgettes at £1.90/kg with the organic version (which I could claim) at £6.67/kg. So being generous I have saved £8. Since you can’t buy the superior yellow courgettes in supermarkets they are priceless.

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One of only 2 yellow courgette plants

Harvest roundup: Climbing beans

I chose two varieties to grow from seed this year. Cosse Violette I’ve grown before and I know they’re straightforward but beautiful on the allotment. I also went to Trail of Tears after hearing about it for years and I was interested to see what all the fuss was about.

Cosse Violette harvest: 2296g

Trail of Tears harvest: 2763g

The standard green beans in the supermarket are £4.50/kg with the organic option £6.67 (are they choosing the same price for all organic veg?). So at around 5kg of produce, I’ve saved  £33.75.

 

What’s been a success on your allotment/ plot this year?

Beans

Screen Shot 2017-01-07 at 6

 

I love beans.

I know it’s not the done thing, after all ‘Beanz Meanz No Friendz’, but after reading  thegardensmallholder‘s recent post I had to confess.

Where did it all start?

The earliest memory of gardening I have is seeing a runner bean germinate. It was primary school, and I’m sat in front of a jam jar filled with a moist green hand towel. Stuck to the inside is a large runner bean seed with its thick white root racing to the bottom of the jar and the green shoot just lifting its head towards the top. The excitement of that time is still with me every time I see something germinate. It’s not surprising to me that a plant with a big fat seed that I can squish into damp compost will always make me happier than scattering dust-like seeds into oblivion: I’m never sure whether they end up in the right place.

Give me a beautiful, shiny, smooth and substantial bean any day. It’s the main reason I persist in trying to get Ricinus to germinate for me. The beetle-like seeds make its stubbornness to get beyond the stage of poking tantalisingly through the compost worthwhile. Runner beans are much more obliging; what’s better than a sturdy, turgid  seedling with huge leaves? They look so eager to get going and growing, almost grateful, and as a thank you for getting them started they put in as much effort as they can.

More posts about seeds:

Springing Up

Real Seeds

Chinese Lanterns

RHS Seeds 2014

Totnes Seed Swap 2014

Chilli Challenge