RHS Wisley Visit

Spring planting at RHS Wisley

The benefit of an RHS membership is free entry into the four gardens

Two weeks ago I popped in to RHS Wisley Garden for a look around. I had an hour to spare before I had to pick the other half up from the train station after attending the Crocus open day. Previously when we’ve visited it’s been during the winter months for reasons we don’t really know. So it was nice to see some some different aspects if the garden. I was going to say it’s nice to see some colour in the garden but anyone who has visited during winter can tell you there’s still plenty of stunning displays.

Fritillaries and anemones flowering
Fritillaries and anemones flowering

Newly added to the must have list in my head

I don’t have any trilliums in the garden but after seeing these they’re definitely on the want list. Dark and mysterious they like shady woodland environments. I have plenty of shady areas due to the stone barn in the garden.

Dark and mysterious Trilliums
Dark and mysterious Trilliums

Eye-searing colourful displays

I’m not a huge fan of bedding displays. It’s certainly not a style of gardening I’m in a hurry to include in my garden but I can appreciate the skill it takes to create such displays. These beds near the entrance to the gardens were very impressive indeed.

Seasonal planting showing a mixed border of spring bulbs and herbaceous perennials / annuals
Seasonal planting showing a mixed border of spring bulbs and herbaceous perennials / annuals

A highlight of the visit was the tulip garden. Apparently they had hundreds of varieties supplied by one of the large Dutch bulb growers to put together the garden exclusively from tulips. The effect was breathtaking and a huge contrast to the more muted palette of the woodland areas.

Spring planting at RHS Wisley
Spring planting at RHS Wisley

Trials beds

The trials area was half full – they’re obviously making plans for new trials starting this year. The Flowering Currant trial was looking great, along with the narcissus and euphorbia beds. However, it was the Erythronium trial that really caught my interest. White Beauty was my favourite here and also finds itself on the want list.

Winter highlights

Enkianthus campanulatus Early flowing shrub
Enkianthus campanulatus Early flowing shrub
Snakes-head fritillary (Fritillaria meleagris)
Snakes-head fritillary (Fritillaria meleagris)

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