Exciting Project: greenhouse/glasshouse/coldframe/orangery!

Wooden-framed windows.

 

Greenhouse Project

This morning I got to have chocolate for breakfast. You’d think that would be the most exciting thing I’ve done today but you would be wrong. I borrowed the other half’s 4×4 and set off up the dual carriageway to collect 10 large glass framed windows. With the help of the amazing Gumtree I found the perfect missing piece of my exciting propagation project.

Wooden-framed windows.
The reclaimed wooden frame windows ready to be used in the new greenhouse project.

A glass-deficiency confession

For all my seedy enthusiasm I have an embarrassing secret. I have a glass deficiency. There is nowhere under glass to protect young plants and nowhere to germinate and establish seedlings. What I do have is my potting bench, inside our barn, and an electric propagator which has to be moved from the windowsill when we have guests. It’s not ideal.

However, all that is going to change. In addition to my lovely barn I have a garden shed (currently used to hold the tumble drier and a freezer we use at Christmas and the dog food) and a wood store (which is currently empty as it has an open side which renders it useless for keeping wood dry so the wood currently lives in the lovely barn). All the pieces of the puzzle but still all jumbled up. The grand plan is to merge the wood store and shed and construct a multifunctional garden building with dry storage in one end and a greenhouse in the other.

A contrarian confession

Time for my second confession: I don’t like greenhouses. Correction, I don’t like metal greenhouses. They’re fine for professional use but in a garden they’re more likely to be hidden away behind a screen than used as an aesthetic addition. Wooden-framed greenhouses, however, are beautiful, desirable (and expensive) features that you drool over in gardening magazines. As are Victorian glasshouses whose magnificent structures blend practicality and style.

In this vein I am hoping to great a vintage/reclaimed wooden glasshouse/greenhouse/coldframe/orangery look on a budget. The first bit of the budget cost £20 and I am smitten.

 

The Full Story

Construction Greenhouse: Part 1

Construction Greenhouse: Part 2

Construction Greenhouse: Part 3

Construction Greenhouse: Part 4

20 thoughts on “Exciting Project: greenhouse/glasshouse/coldframe/orangery!

    1. Thank you – I’ll update to let you know how I’m doing. I’ll probably ask someone who’s handier with some tools than me to put it together. The roof can land on my head but I don’t want it landing on the tomatoes! Did you design the internal layout before you built your greenhouse or has it evolved?

      1. It was here when we bought the place. We did have to replace the roof last summer. That is a two or three person job! Lots of caulking and weather stripping at the end.

    1. Thank you – I’ll update to let you know how I’m doing. I’ll probably ask someone who’s handier with some tools than me to put it together. The roof can land on my head but I don’t want it landing on the tomatoes! Did you design the internal layout before you built your greenhouse or has it evolved?

      1. It was here when we bought the place. We did have to replace the roof last summer. That is a two or three person job! Lots of caulking and weather stripping at the end.

  1. This is our sort of project – and using reclaimed stuff is great, although when we replaced our over-large (yes, it was) wooden (sorry!) greenhouse it was with a much smaller and metal framed one, but apart from that we do our own construction. Have you thought of using reclaimed bricks for the lower walls…?

    1. Good idea. Initially I thought I could have the glazed panels to the floor but the dimensions don’t quite work out. I also have 2 retrievers with powerful and overexcitable tails – things could get smashy.

      However, we do have a huge pile of local stone in our yet to be converted barn which would be inkeeping with the local vernacular.

  2. This is our sort of project – and using reclaimed stuff is great, although when we replaced our over-large (yes, it was) wooden (sorry!) greenhouse it was with a much smaller and metal framed one, but apart from that we do our own construction. Have you thought of using reclaimed bricks for the lower walls…?

    1. Good idea. Initially I thought I could have the glazed panels to the floor but the dimensions don’t quite work out. I also have 2 retrievers with powerful and overexcitable tails – things could get smashy.

      However, we do have a huge pile of local stone in our yet to be converted barn which would be inkeeping with the local vernacular.

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