Garden Update 10th February 2018

Garden Update 10th February 2018

The big chill has meant I’m not too keen to get many things started in the garden so far this year. A big job for the year is going to be replanting the far garden but I’m holding fire until the soil warms a bit. Most of my pottering this week, therefore, has been in the greenhouse.

Previous Updates

Garden Update 18th November

Garden Update 4th November 

Greenhouse Update

I have started off some hardier seeds that came from the Hardy Plant Society and these are outside the greenhouse getting a bit of cold and wet treatment which apparently will improve germination once the weather heats up.

It’s also time to move on some cuttings and divisions I made at the end of last year. These Teucrium lucidrys, also known as hedge germanders, have rooted well. They’re now in their own little spaces to grow on some more.

As I was clearing out one of the borders in the far garden I came across my Stipa gigantea. I was lifting anything salvageable and clearing away the roots of bindweed. This was split into small divisions and they’ve now produced enough root to warrant giving them some more space. So far no sign of any bindweed.

If you take a look at the end of my 2017 Seed Sowing Spreadsheet (now updated with a 2018 tab) you’ll see a bunch of Chiltern Seed sowings of some prairie perennials. Some of these need to move out of the tiny plug trays if they’re ever going to thrive. They’re still tiny so I hope they can fill the space.

Garden Update 10th February 2018. Allotment, Garden, Gardening, Harvest, Grow your own, homegrown, homegrown, roots, autumn harvest, plot to plate, wooden board, gdnblog, gdnbloggers, gdnblogger, blog, Chard, garlic, Mulch, autumn, crop rotation, greenhouse, astrantia, cavelo nero, romanesco, cuttings, plug plants, teucrium, leeks, tulips,
Potted on seedlings of Echinacea paradoxa, Rudbeckia maxima and Digitalis mertonensis

Once I’m back from a little holiday I’ll get started on the Tomatoes and some Chillies when I’m around to keep an eye on them better.

Six on Saturday – 20th January 2018

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.

Joining in with this popular garden bloggers meme

The Six on Saturday meme was started by The Propagator and you can find links to other garden bloggers taking part in the comments on his weekly posts.

January marks the beginning of the calendar year but in the garden, it’s as if the starting whistle wasn’t heard. Nothing really changes pre and post Christmas. You get a little more day length but the colder temperatures hold progress back. The new sowing year gets going in February for me so January is typically a waiting month.

That being said, there are signs of a turn in the year: we have our first spring flowers.

ONE

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Hellebore

I love Hellebores. We did have a pure white form from Hill House Nursery but I’ve yet to see any sign that it has survived our absence from the garden. I need more.

TWO

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Flowering currant

I have deliberately kept the photo small, my photography skills haven’t made it into the new year it seems. This flowering currant got a brutal hacking when we came back to the garden so I’m pleased to see it’s forgiven me and will put on a good show this year.

THREE

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Black Bamboo

The black bamboo I have in my large containers remains weedy and sulky. The one in the ground is earning its place better with lovely dark glossy stems.

FOUR

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Snowdrops

These little plants seem to be struggling. They come up every year, and I’ve planted more a few years ago to boost their numbers, but they are always short and small so I’m not sure they’re overly happy here.

FIVE

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Lasagne pot

There’s progress in the lasagne pots. Digging through bulbs when planting in the borders is a real bugbear of mine so instead, I group my spring bulbs all in three large terracotta pots.

SIX

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Primroses

The primroses are still flowering but they look a little battered by the storms and frosts we’ve had over the past 4 weeks.

So that’s my Six on Saturday. Please join in to mark the changes in your garden over the year.

Six on Saturday – 16th December 2017

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.

Joining in with this popular garden bloggers meme

After two weeks of cheating a little on this Six on Saturday meme, firstly showing images from a nearby woodland and then last week picking the best of someone else’s garden, this time around I’ve picked some highlights from my garden.

When the light levels are low, and most of the perennial plants have dived under the soil to wait out winter’s worst, evergreen plants carry interest through undeterred. We didn’t have any of the recent snow this far into the South West so the garden is unscathed.

The Six on Saturday meme was started by The Propagator and you can find links to other garden bloggers taking part in the comments on his weekly posts.

ONE

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Primrose

This little Primrose was rudely lifted some time ago and dumped into a terracotta pot to be sorted later. Later hasn’t arrived so it’s still in there but doesn’t seem to mind and has started to flower. One day I’ll divide it and find room for it somewhere in the garden. In the meantime, I’ll just enjoy the flowers.

TWO

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Holly

This is one of the poor Holly bushes that have been languishing in containers for over 5 years. Whilst they have always formed plenty of berries, they never grew well, putting on only minimal growth.

When we were in Australia mum fostered them and duly doted on them with water and feed with very little in return. Only when the metal containers had rusted through and they needed repotting did I realise my mistake – they were still in their 2L plastic pots!!

I must have been planting them after a night shift.

THREE

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Tellima grandiflora

This easy to overlook woodland perennial is one of my favourite plants. It’s evergreen, has soft leaves and sends up delicate spikes of bell-shaped flowers that are fringed with pink. It’s also easy to start from seed and that’s where all of my plants have come from.

I’ve put a mental note to gather some seed in 2018 and start some more.

FOUR

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Helleborus foetidus

A horrible name for a very good plant. I like the evergreen foliage mostly. The flowers which are starting to perform now are just an added extra. Again, this tolerates low light levels well and earns its space in a shady garden.

FIVE

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Variegated bamboo

I’m a bit indifferent to bamboos. I have Phyllostachys nigra in a large container which has never delivered on its promise. Mostly they can be thugs but this shorter variegate variety was in the cottage when we moved here and hasn’t really spread. It adds a brighter element to a dark dry corner

SIX

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Grass display at the front of the cottage

The cattle feed troughs at the front of the cottage have done really well after their revamp this year. Even into December, they are full of texture and interest. When the low light catches the inflorescences it looks great. They have required no attention since planting.

The planting is a mixture of Stipa tenuissima, Calamagrostis × acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’, a small leaved Hebe plants grown from cuttings, Euphorbia myrsinites. There are tulips newly planted ready to put on some spring colour.

 

 

 

 

So that’s my first Six on Saturday. Please join in to mark the changes in your garden over the year.

Six on Saturday: 9th December 2017

Six snapshots in the garden to chart the changing seasons

Last weeks Six on Saturday went quite well so I’ve decided to give it another go this week. I’m away from the house so it’s another cheat week from me. The weather has turned chilly and we’re staying at the in-laws’ house in Surrey. The frost in the garden here was too much of a novelty for me so I thought I’d share.

The Six on Saturday meme was started by The Propagator so go and take a look at his weekly post. Also look through the comments to find more blogs joining in.

ONE

This Winter Jasmine putting in a good show this time of year but I doubt I’ll ever covet it for my own garden. I find the growth habit odd and for most of the year it’s just wiry stems.

TWO

Seed heads of Japanese Anemone. This is a lesson in not clearing away your perennials once they’ve gone to sleep for winter – look what you’ll miss out on!

THREE

The same goes for Hydrangeas. Leaving the spent flower heads is supposed to provide some cover against frost but more importantly it keeps interest into the depths of winter.

FOUR

Frost covered acorns and their husks.

FIVE

This Azalea is another plant that I probably won’t plant myself but the foliage at this time of year has great colour and the frosting looks great.

SIX

Well it is nearly Christmas! I’m getting more interested in conifers and the like. The pale blue needles on this Pine match the chilly morning air. After my morning promenade around the garden my coffee had gone cold and my fingers had chilled. Enjoy the frosty weekend.

Zinnia: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017

Zinnia: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017, cut flowers, cutflowers, annuals, annual plants, drought tolerant, flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, varieties, plant comparison,

Taking a look at the Zinnia trial happening at RHS Wisley

As part of my recent visit to RHS Wisley, I made a point of visiting the Plant Trial Beds. These are where the Award of Garden Merit (AGM) plants are trialled and awarded the highest horticultural accolade. This year I was pleased to see the Zinnia and Echinacea trials in full bloom.

Zinnia: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017, cut flowers, cutflowers, annuals, annual plants, drought tolerant, flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, varieties, plant comparison,
Trial beds at Wisley

The Zinnia trial was planted this year, which makes sense when you consider that they are annual plants in the UK so they can’t run longer trials, and there are 100 varieties on trial. I’ve grown them a few time over the years. I try to find varieties that have bright, clear colours that age well. A lot of the plants on show had a muddy colouring and tend to have unsightly flower heads as they age. If you’re quick to dead-head that won’t be too much of an issue.

If you want to find out more about the current plant trials happening at Wisley then follow this link to the PDF.

RHS Plant Trials 2017-2019 list PDF

 

Zinnia: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017, cut flowers, cutflowers, annuals, annual plants, drought tolerant, flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, varieties, plant comparison,
The trial beds at RHS Wisley

Zinnia ‘Red Spider’

Zinnia: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017, cut flowers, cutflowers, annuals, annual plants, drought tolerant, flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, varieties, plant comparison,
Zinnia ‘Red Spider’

This one had really strongly coloured petals. It’s not the blowsiest of the varieties on offer but I thought the intense blooms were very special. The older flowers still looked good on the plant and it was nice and tall.

Zinnia ‘Zinderella Peach’

Zinnia: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017, cut flowers, cutflowers, annuals, annual plants, drought tolerant, flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, varieties, plant comparison,
Zinnia elegans ‘Zinderella Peach’

All the plants in the Zinderella breeding program were very strong contenders for my favourites. This burnt-orange flower was such an unusual colour I had to have it. The older blooms have a yellower tinge but they complement the fresh flowers well.

Zinnia ‘Envy’

Zinnia: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017, cut flowers, cutflowers, annuals, annual plants, drought tolerant, flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, varieties, plant comparison,
Zinnia elegans ‘Envy’

Envy was a variety known to me before seeing it at the trial beds. The clear, bright white flowers are large and impressive.

Zinnia Benary’s Giant White

Zinnia: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017, cut flowers, cutflowers, annuals, annual plants, drought tolerant, flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, varieties, plant comparison,
Zinnia elegans ‘Benary’s Giant White’

Another white variety is Benary’s Giant White, which has larger blooms than Envy, that has a creamy tinge when they age which is really pleasing on the eye.

In Summary

If I had to choose from the 100 varieties on offer then this group of 4 plants would be top of the list. These can all be grown from seed so you might get some variation. The seed strains for some of the mixed varieties on trial contained good coloured forms but I struggled to enjoy the colour mixings all mixed together. I prefer just one type at a time.

Suppliers

Chiltern Seeds – Chiltern Seed list 25 varieties including all 4 on this page

Plant World Seeds – A local seed producer here in Devon lists 3 varieties.

Higgledy Garden – 3 varieties from a South West seed company

Echinacea: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017

Echinacea: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017. Coneflower, prairie planting, prairie plants, american native, american native plants, perennial, perennial plants, drought tolerant, daisy, daisy flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, echinacea varieties, plant comparison,

Picking my favourite varieties in the 2017 Echinacea Plant Trial

As part of my recent visit to RHS Wisley, I made a point of visiting the Plant Trial Beds. These are where the Award of Garden Merit (AGM) plants are trialled and awarded the highest horticultural accolade. This year I was pleased to see the Zinnia and Echinacea trials in full bloom.

The trial is in its second year of three and, for me, there were some clear winners in the patch. I didn’t have any Echinacea in my garden when I visited Wisley but I soon corrected that by buying ‘Magnus Superb’.

If you want to find out more about the current plant trials happening at Wisley then follow this link to the PDF.

RHS Plant Trials 2017-2019 list PDF

Echinacea: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017. Coneflower, prairie planting, prairie plants, american native, american native plants, perennial, perennial plants, drought tolerant, daisy, daisy flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, echinacea varieties, plant comparison,
Echinacea trial beds

Traditional pink Echinacea

When I think of Echinacea the first thing that comes to mind is tall, pinky purple, daisy-like flowers held high amongst a mixed grass border. Their rich, deep pinks are complemented by the central cone that often has burnt-orange tints.

For this reason, my favourite selection has to be ‘Fatal Attraction’ – apparently bred by Piet Oudolf – and has a real quality of colour with strong dark stems. The Sombrero Baja Burgundy (possibly a breeding label rather than its eventual commercial name) had petals that were much closer to a cherry-red. ‘Pink Shimmer’ seemed to glow and really stood out amongst the rest.

White Echinacea varieties

I like the white versions too. They can bring a lighter feel to a border and are a little more restful to look at.

‘Green Jewel’ was white/acid green on the petals and stood tall. ‘White Meditation was a much more compact bush and would suit the front of a border or a pot. The species variant ‘alba’ has relaxed reflexed petals.

Double Echinacea varieties

I’ve never grown the double echinacea varieties and at first glance, they’re a little off-putting. The more you stare the better they get and I think I could get used to them.

‘Catharina Red’ and ‘Elegance’ were the least fussy of the varieties on offer.

For something different

Echinacea: RHS Wisley Plant Trials 2017. Coneflower, prairie planting, prairie plants, american native, american native plants, perennial, perennial plants, drought tolerant, daisy, daisy flower, pollinator plants, good for bees, good for butterflies, wisley, rhs, plant trial, echinacea varieties, plant comparison,
Echinacea ‘Tiki Torch’

I really liked ‘Tiki Torch’ and it is my second favourite variety on trial. The orange is rich and could easily be mixed in a border with yellows and purples and the plants looked healthy.

In summary

These nine varieties are my favourite of all the types on trial. Some of the plants don’t have commercial names yet so are very new. It’s hard to know how well they will perform in a garden setting and how much hardiness and longevity they can muster. A lot of the varieties, particularly those most often flaunted in catalogues as being a colour break, were a disappointing, almost muddy, set of colours. Many had few blooming stems or had flopped untidily.

A plant for the month of August: The Japanese Anemone

#japaneseanemone #anemone #whiteanemone #whitejapaneseanemone #pinkanemone #pinkjapaneseanemone #pinkflower #whiteflower #herbaceous #herbaceousperennial #summerflower #cottagegarden #garden #gardening #gardenblog #gdnblogger #gdnbloggers #gardenbloggers #gardenblogger #devon #courtyardgarden

Japanese Anemone: A varied herbaceous perennial that’s synonymous with the late summer borders in a cottage garden

 

Whilst I have always admired these plants when seen in other people’s gardens, to my knowledge I have only introduced one into my own. You can imagine my surprise then when, this year, I can count three or four types of Japanese Anemone bursting into flower.

These are easy to grow and yet impactful additions to mixed borders. They have most interest at this time of year so I would always plant them in a mixed border with other plants that can keep the show going. Some of them can be a bit thuggish and form large clumps. What a problem to have! The flowers are beautiful and are improved by mass planting.

I apologise if some of the images are a little blurry. It was a windy day and these tall flower heads like to waft in the breeze. I only wish I had the name labels of these. If anyone has any ideas which varieties these are please get in touch.

My purposely introduced Japanese Anemone

We had been to a plant nursery on the day our little Blue cat was run over. It seemed appropriate to mark the place where we buried her by placing a plant on top. This diminutive, pink Japanese Anemone only reaches 30cm high but the colour is deep and intense.

#japaneseanemone #anemone #whiteanemone #whitejapaneseanemone #pinkanemone #pinkjapaneseanemone #pinkflower #whiteflower #herbaceous #herbaceousperennial #summerflower #cottagegarden #garden #gardening #gardenblog #gdnblogger #gdnbloggers #gardenbloggers #gardenblogger #devon #courtyardgarden
A compact Japanese Anemone marking the spot our little Blue cat was buried

The others

There is a white Japanese Anemone that seems to be in two places in the garden. One is in the Immediate Garden and is following the rules of the colour theme. The other is gate-crashing the Left Border in the Far Garden which is supposed to be a brighter scheme. I like that it has a semi-double flower.

 

Another plant is in the sunny Right Border and is 5ft tall and has a clear hot pink to the face. Its back side is a subtle mauve where it meets the stem. I think the flower buds are just as exciting as the flowers themselves and the seedheads are attractive too. You really do get a lot from these plants.

There is another patch that has just one flower this year. This looks very similar to our memorial Japanese Anemone, mentioned above, and sits under the crabapple tree in the Immediate Garden.

#japaneseanemone #anemone #whiteanemone #whitejapaneseanemone #pinkanemone #pinkjapaneseanemone #pinkflower #whiteflower #herbaceous #herbaceousperennial #summerflower #cottagegarden #garden #gardening #gardenblog #gdnblogger #gdnbloggers #gardenbloggers #gardenblogger #devon #courtyardgarden
A very short pinky lilac Japanese Anemone

Cheap and cheerful – how to create more basil plants using water cuttings 

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings

A simple way to take basil cuttings to make new plants for free

I have a terrible record when it comes to growing basil from seeds so I was really intrigued to hear about taking cuttings from plants to create more. I can’t believe it’s never occurred to me before to take basil cuttings. Usually, I cheat by buying a plant in a supermarket, with multiple elongated seedlings crammed together, and try to divide and plant these out. This has given me a small amount of success if I can harvest the leaves before the slugs get them.

I was listening to a recent podcast episode of Still Growing and was inspired to try basil cuttings myself.

How to take basil cuttings

The vigorous growth on basil is perfect for softwood cuttings. I took lengths of stem around 2-3 inches long and removed the lower leaves. Cutting under a node (where the leaves were emerging from the stem) encourages roots to develop at a point where the hormones are concentrated. The very softest growth at the top of the cutting was pinched out.

The leaves and tips that I stripped off were used in a pasta dish so no wastage.

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings
Basil cuttings in water

Since basil is related closely to mint it should root as easily as mint. At the same time as I took the basil cuttings I also took Peppermint and Sweet Potato. These were placed into small glasses somewhere sheltered, out of direct sunlight. The downstairs toilet windowsill is perfect. An unexpected bonus is the aromatic wafts you get from the basil and peppermint.

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings
Basil, Sweet Potato and Peppermint cuttings

Waiting for roots on my basil cuttings

The Sweet Potato and Peppermint definitely won the root race and had grown some adventitious roots within 4 days. I had to wait a long 10 days to see some action on the basil.

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings
Roots showing after 10 days

Potting on basil cuttings

Once there was a good amount of root on each basil cutting, and when I had time to do it, I potted them on into loose multipurpose compost to establish.

Cheap and cheerful - how to create more basil plants using water cuttings
Good amount of root ready for potting up

This was a really easy bit of propagation and was quite successful. A couple of minutes work to prepare the cuttings was all it took to get the process going. One cutting had to be discarded due to rot (It needed to be removed from the water) and I replaced the water twice over the 10 days. That’s it! I’m hoping they’ll establish well so I can pot them on again before starting to harvest.

Wordless Wednesday 28th June 2017

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Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017

Joining a popular garden bloggers meme and sharing the flowers blooming in my garden each month.

Every 15th of the month garden bloggers around the month share what’s happening in their gardens by photographing what’s in flower on their plot on that day. I last joined in this event in April 2014 and thought it might be fun to come out to play again. I’m looking forward to connecting with more garden bloggers through this.

Previous Garden Bloggers Bloom Day posts

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day April 2014

Where it started

Carol at May Dreams Gardens hosts this very popular meme and you can find out more about her blog here.

International Comparisons

With the help of this useful map my garden would be in the USDA plant hardiness Zone 9a.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Astrantia major
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Eryngium planum
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Eryngium yuccifolium

This guy can get to over 6ft in the border – I’ve sown more seeds this year to see if I can get a few more dotted through the sunny border in the far garden.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Stachys byzantina

I love, love, love this plant and I can’t wait for it to produce seeds so I can get a drift going. The leaves feel exactly the same as our chocolate labrador’s ears. He passed away last year and it’s lovely to sit and stroke them.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Rose ‘Gertrude Jekyll’

The best smelling climbing rose; its bright pink (bordering on Barbie) is tolerated for the scent.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Allium christophii
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Astrantia major
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Geranium – unknown variety
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Iris foetidissima

I’ve taken out clumps of this from around the garden as the coarse strap leaves and muddy flowers are easily out-performed with something else in the space.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Rambling rose – unknown variety
Garden Bloggers Bloom Day June 2017
Climbing rose- unknown variety

I know I planted this one 3 years ago but it’s the only rose not to have its label kept in the ‘label bag’.  Lightly scented and closer to the colour pallet we’re aiming for in this part of the garden. It tones down Gertrude Jekyll.

Other UK blogs that get involved

Sarah Shoesmith’s blog for the Hardy Plant Society

Glebe House

The Rusty Duck