Garden Visit: Gran Canaria Botanical Garden

Garden Visit Gran Canaria Botanical Garden, botanic, botanical, botanic garden, botanical garden, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Hortitourism, garden, garden blog, garden holiday, gardening holiday, garden visits, garden blog, euphorbia, echinocactus, ficus, aloe,

Gran Canaria Botanical Garden was a must-see on our recent holiday

I always make a point of seeking out something horticultural when travelling. This normally takes the form of visiting a botanical garden, or two. This time was the turn of the Gran Canaria Botanical Garden.

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View from the high part of the ravine inland

How to find Gran Canaria Botanical Garden

 

Garden Visit Gran Canaria Botanical Garden, botanic, botanical, botanic garden, botanical garden, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Hortitourism, garden, garden blog, garden holiday, gardening holiday, garden visits, garden blog, euphorbia, echinocactus, ficus, aloe,

The garden is located in a ravine to the south west of Las Palmas.

We parked on the road outside the garden on the GC-310 which had no parking restrictions. This brings you to the main entrance on the lower, flatter part of the garden. There is another entrance at the top of the hill next to the Restaurante Jardin Canario.

I looked at getting public transport from the south of the island but it would have taken four bus transfers to get there. Instead, we found it easier to hire a car and drive directly to the garden.

Useful Information

Website: http://www.jardincanario.org/

Entrance: FREE!

Opening times:

From April 1 to September 30: from 9:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

From October 1 to March 31: from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

The lower bit of the garden is suitable for people in wheelchairs or travelling with a child in a pram as it’s mostly level and the paths are well-maintained. Over the river, on the ravine side, it’s not appropriate for these groups as it’s all stairs. I would also suggest not taking young children on that side as the paths are narrow and don’t have railings. The drop off the side was very high at points.

Garden Visit Gran Canaria Botanical Garden, botanic, botanical, botanic garden, botanical garden, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Hortitourism, garden, garden blog, garden holiday, gardening holiday, garden visits, garden blog, euphorbia, echinocactus, ficus, aloe,
The steep sides of the ravine have Dragon Trees and narrow stone paths.

Around the garden

Half of the garden is a steep ravine side that leads up to the restaurant. The other half is a gently rising but flatter space with different themes:

  • Cactus Garden
  • World Garden
  • Pine Forest
  • The Coast
Garden Visit Gran Canaria Botanical Garden, botanic, botanical, botanic garden, botanical garden, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Hortitourism, garden, garden blog, garden holiday, gardening holiday, garden visits, garden blog, euphorbia, echinocactus, ficus, aloe,
Mixed planting on the lower level

 

Notable Plants

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Strelitzia parvifolia
Garden Visit Gran Canaria Botanical Garden, botanic, botanical, botanic garden, botanical garden, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Hortitourism, garden, garden blog, garden holiday, gardening holiday, garden visits, garden blog, euphorbia, echinocactus, ficus, aloe,
Aloe vaombe
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Echinocactus grusonii
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Ficus socotrana
Garden Visit Gran Canaria Botanical Garden, botanic, botanical, botanic garden, botanical garden, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Hortitourism, garden, garden blog, garden holiday, gardening holiday, garden visits, garden blog, euphorbia, echinocactus, ficus, aloe,
Euphorbia schimperi
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Euphorbia canariensis – close up
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A grove of the native Euphorbia canariensis
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Euphorbia atropurpurea var. atroppurpurea
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Euphorbia regis-jubae

 

Other International Garden Visits

 

Melbourne Botanical Garden

Toowoomba Botanic Garden

Singapore Botanical Garden

Gardens by the Bay, Singapore

My RHS Members’ Seed Scheme 2018

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RHS Members’ Seed Scheme

One of the benefits of being a member of the RHS is the opportunity to join in with the RHS Members’ Seed Scheme. I’ve done this a few times over the years and it’s a good way of getting some interesting seeds you wouldn’t find so cheaply from the usual seed catalogues.

 

Find out more about the scheme on their website

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My 15 packets of seed

How the scheme works

Staff at RHS Wisley collect seed throughout the year and pack them up. So you know that they have been accurately collected from the correct plant and that the plants will have been good examples of their type.

You place your order online from November to March (this year the dates were 1st November 2017 to 31st March). They hope to have completed all orders by the end of April.

You can choose up to 15 items as a ‘first choice’ with five additional selections as backups should your first choices be unavailable. There were over 200 seeds included in this year’s seedlist.

There’s a charge of £8.50 for the seeds and delivery. As you receive 15 packets this only costs you around 57p per packet.

How did I do this year?

This is the list of seeds I requested this year;

Herbaceous perennials

  • Cephalaria gigantea
  • Eryngium amethystinum
  • Francoa sonchifolia
  • Geranium psilostemon
  • Helleborus argutifolius
  • Patrinia scabiosifolia
  • Phytolacca americana
  • Sanguisorba canadensis
  • Thalictrum flavum
  • Verbascum chaixii
  • Veronicastrum virginicum

Trees shrubs

  • Callistemon citrinus
  • Cornus kousa
  • Carpenteria Californica
  • Paeonia delavayi

And these were exactly the ones I received!

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A duplicate order

It would be sensible to coordinate my orders between the RHS and the Hardy Plant Society as I managed to double order Cephalaria, gigantea, Carpenteria californica and Paeonia delavayi. I must really want to have these in the garden. I also realised that I ordered these a few years back and didn’t do very well in getting them to survive so hopefully, I’ll do better this year.

Would I do it again?

Definitely! Although I may run out of both greenhouse space and garden space.

Garden Update 10th February 2018

Garden Update 10th February 2018

The big chill has meant I’m not too keen to get many things started in the garden so far this year. A big job for the year is going to be replanting the far garden but I’m holding fire until the soil warms a bit. Most of my pottering this week, therefore, has been in the greenhouse.

Previous Updates

Garden Update 18th November

Garden Update 4th November 

Greenhouse Update

I have started off some hardier seeds that came from the Hardy Plant Society and these are outside the greenhouse getting a bit of cold and wet treatment which apparently will improve germination once the weather heats up.

It’s also time to move on some cuttings and divisions I made at the end of last year. These Teucrium lucidrys, also known as hedge germanders, have rooted well. They’re now in their own little spaces to grow on some more.

As I was clearing out one of the borders in the far garden I came across my Stipa gigantea. I was lifting anything salvageable and clearing away the roots of bindweed. This was split into small divisions and they’ve now produced enough root to warrant giving them some more space. So far no sign of any bindweed.

If you take a look at the end of my 2017 Seed Sowing Spreadsheet (now updated with a 2018 tab) you’ll see a bunch of Chiltern Seed sowings of some prairie perennials. Some of these need to move out of the tiny plug trays if they’re ever going to thrive. They’re still tiny so I hope they can fill the space.

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Potted on seedlings of Echinacea paradoxa, Rudbeckia maxima and Digitalis mertonensis

Once I’m back from a little holiday I’ll get started on the Tomatoes and some Chillies when I’m around to keep an eye on them better.

My Hardy Plant Society Seed Distribution 2018

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Hardy Plant Society Seed Distribution

 

One of the benefits of being a member of the Hardy Plant Society is the opportunity to join in with the Hardy Plant Society Seed Distribution Scheme. What I wasn’t aware of until recently is that this wonderful perk is also available to non-members like myself.

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Hardy Plant Society seeds arrive

Who are they?

The Hardy Plant Society are exactly what they sound like. They’re a group of volunteers who are particularly well organised and have been going for over half a century. They are dedicated to promoting the benefits of using hardy plants in the garden and celebrating the wide variety this offers. They organise local and national meetings for members wanting to learn more.

Find out more on their website.

How the scheme works

Members of the society collect and donate seed during the year and once they’ve been received the society sends out a seed list in November and publishes this list on their website. This year there were over 2000 different seeds listed which is truly amazing.

You submit 20 preferred seeds with 10 substitutes should your initial options run out. All you pay is £5 postage.

You can then request Random Sets which are packets of 25 named seeds gathered from the seeds that are left once all the other orders have been filled. That’s just an additional £2.50!

So for £7.50, I have received 45 packets of seed to play with this year. That’s just 17p a packet.

Members of the society get their orders filled first so they’re more likely to get what they’ve requested. Also, if they donate 5 packets of seed to the scheme they can choose an additional 10 packets to order.

How did I do this year?

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First Pick selection
Abies koreana  Received
Bupleurum longifolium ex ‘Bronze Beauty’
Canna indica
Carpenteria californica Received
Cyclamen africanum
Dahlia merckii Received
Eryngium bourgatii Received
Eryngium bourgatii ex ‘Picos Amethyst’
Eryngium venustum Received
Libertia peregrinans Received
Paeonia cambessedesii Received
Paeonia delavayi Received
Ricinus communis
Rosa glauca ambig Received
Thalictrum aquilegiifolium ex ‘Album’ Received
Thalictrum delavayi Received
Trillium chloropetalum Received
Trillium kurabayashii
Trillium rugelii
Teucrium scorodonia
Teucrium fruticans  
Thalictrum ichangense  
Thalictrum reniforme  
Thalictrum rochebruneanum Received 
Podophyllum aurantiocaule  
Podophyllim peltatum var annulare  
Paeonia wittmanniana  
Paeonia veitchii Received 
Lilium martagon Received 
Dierama tyrium  
Cornus mas Received 
Cephalaria gigantea Received 

 

So, out of my 20 first choice options I received 11. I had 5 out of my 10 substitutes and also received 3 extras to make up the 20. These were Angelica sylvestris ex ‘Vicar’s Mead’, Digitalis purpurea f. albiflora and, Delphinium ex Belladonna Group.

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Random Set

The seeds I received from the Random Set are listed below.

Iris ensata ex ‘Fortune’
Papaver rhoeas
Trollius chinensis ex ‘Golden Queen’
Scabiosa columbaria subsp. ochroleuca ex ‘Moon Dance’
Silene dioica
Romulea bulbocodium
Stipa tenuissima
Thalictrum minus ex ‘Aldiantifolium’
Salvia sclarea var. turkestanica hort.
Sisyrinchium californicum ex Brachypus Group
Primula sikkimensis
Pilosella aurantiaca
Narcissus mixed 2016 introductions
Malva moschata f. alba
Lavatera trimestris ex ‘Ruby Regis’
Ligularia ex ‘Britt Marie Crawford’
Lychnis chalcedonica
Helleborus foetidus
Fritillaria imperialis ex ‘Lutea’
Incarvillea delavayi pink flowers
Geranium psilostemon
Geranium ex Silver Cloak Group
Eryngium eburneum
Betula papyrifera
Arisaema consanguineum

 

The benefit of a Random Set is you get another 25 packets. There may have been lots of the 2000-strong list that didn’t make it into your top 35 selections but you’d be happy to get nonetheless. The downside will always be that there may be some plants that don’t match the conditions you have in your garden. For example, I’ll be looking to give away the Ligularia and Primula seeds to someone with a damper plot. I also have a lot of Stipa tenuissima and Helleborus foetidus in the garden so I’ll pass these on too.

Would I do it again?

Definitely! Although I may run out of both greenhouse space and garden space.

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First seeds go out for some cold stratification

Six on Saturday – 20th January 2018

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.

Joining in with this popular garden bloggers meme

The Six on Saturday meme was started by The Propagator and you can find links to other garden bloggers taking part in the comments on his weekly posts.

January marks the beginning of the calendar year but in the garden, it’s as if the starting whistle wasn’t heard. Nothing really changes pre and post Christmas. You get a little more day length but the colder temperatures hold progress back. The new sowing year gets going in February for me so January is typically a waiting month.

That being said, there are signs of a turn in the year: we have our first spring flowers.

ONE

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Hellebore

I love Hellebores. We did have a pure white form from Hill House Nursery but I’ve yet to see any sign that it has survived our absence from the garden. I need more.

TWO

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Flowering currant

I have deliberately kept the photo small, my photography skills haven’t made it into the new year it seems. This flowering currant got a brutal hacking when we came back to the garden so I’m pleased to see it’s forgiven me and will put on a good show this year.

THREE

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Black Bamboo

The black bamboo I have in my large containers remains weedy and sulky. The one in the ground is earning its place better with lovely dark glossy stems.

FOUR

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Snowdrops

These little plants seem to be struggling. They come up every year, and I’ve planted more a few years ago to boost their numbers, but they are always short and small so I’m not sure they’re overly happy here.

FIVE

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Lasagne pot

There’s progress in the lasagne pots. Digging through bulbs when planting in the borders is a real bugbear of mine so instead, I group my spring bulbs all in three large terracotta pots.

SIX

Six on Saturday 20th January 2018. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Primroses

The primroses are still flowering but they look a little battered by the storms and frosts we’ve had over the past 4 weeks.

So that’s my Six on Saturday. Please join in to mark the changes in your garden over the year.

More Gardening Podcasts

More Gardening Podcasts. On The Ledge, Still Growing, A Way to Garden, We Dig Plants, gardening podcasts, garden podcasts, garden media, garden media guild, podcast, podcasts, alternative media, gardening, allotment, allotments, gardening blog, allotment blog,

New and newly-found Gardening Podcasts to get into in 2018 and see you through the cold dark days of winter

I’m a bit addicted to Gardening Podcasts and last year I listed My top 5 UK podcasts for gardeners. I had been out of the UK and to some degree out of the gardening habit for a couple of years. Those podcasts gave me a link to what was happening back in the UK and reminded me what I was missing.

I still think podcasts are a great way to access gardening information and there has been a huge increase in interest in these alternative media sources. The recent Garden Media Guild Awards really highlighted the trend in garden media away from traditional offerings to newer modalities and newer voices.

On The Ledge

More Gardening Podcasts. On The Ledge, Still Growing, A Way to Garden, We Dig Plants, gardening podcasts, garden podcasts, garden media, garden media guild, podcast, podcasts, alternative media, gardening, allotment, allotments, gardening blog, allotment blog,

The only UK-based blog on this updated list of Gardening Podcasts. That’s a little sad but this one is a belter.

This podcast focusses on all the houseplants you can imagine, combining instruction on how to care, how to manage pests and interesting interviews with growers and houseplant obsessives.

It’s hosted by Jane Perrone, the former gardening editor at The Guardian and now a freelancer. Jane was featured in my last podcast post as co-host of Sow Grow Repeat with Alys Fowler which has now been shelved.

A Way to Garden

More Gardening Podcasts. On The Ledge, Still Growing, A Way to Garden, We Dig Plants, gardening podcasts, garden podcasts, garden media, garden media guild, podcast, podcasts, alternative media, gardening, allotment, allotments, gardening blog, allotment blog,

Megan Caine is a well-known American Garden Author. She hosts this show which consists of interviews with relevant experts in nature and science as well as gardeners. Often there’s a Q+A correspondence edition.

It’s very calm and controlled and thoroughly interesting.

 

Still Growing

More Gardening Podcasts. On The Ledge, Still Growing, A Way to Garden, We Dig Plants, gardening podcasts, garden podcasts, garden media, garden media guild, podcast, podcasts, alternative media, gardening, allotment, allotments, gardening blog, allotment blog,

Jennifer Ebeling hosts this podcast from Maple Grove Minnesota. She’s an engaging host and we’ve had some lovely interaction via Twitter and the facebook group for this podcast. Every week covers a new topic which could be a design concept, a plant, a landscape, an author interview.

If you can get beyond the upbeat American style ( this dour Brit found this jarring initially but I’m fully converted) you’ll be hooked.

We Dig Plants

More Gardening Podcasts. On The Ledge, Still Growing, A Way to Garden, We Dig Plants, gardening podcasts, garden podcasts, garden media, garden media guild, podcast, podcasts, alternative media, gardening, allotment, allotments, gardening blog, allotment blog,Hosted by Carmen DeVito and  Alice Marcus Krieg, garden designers based in New York, this podcast has gone through some changes this year. In 2017 they’ve been exploring the different USDA Zones in the USA with a monthly episode. The concept is ‘Zone Envy’ and provides interesting information into the different climates in North America.

These women are funny and well-informed and I like their approach.

My last 5 Gardening Podcast Recommendations

Gardeners’ Question Time – Still going strong

Publisher: BBC Radio 4
Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006qp2f/episodes/downloads

Gardens Illustrated Podcast – All quiet from this one recently

Publisher: Gardens Illustrated Magazine
Source: http://www.gardensillustrated.com/podcasts

RHS Gardening Podcast – Never fails to deliver

Publisher: The RHS
Source: https://www.rhs.org.uk/about-the-rhs/publications/podcasts

Sow, Grow, Repeat – This one is no more

Publisher: The Guardian
Source: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/series/sow-grow-repeat

The Sod Show – Still going

Publisher: The Sod Show
Source: http://www.sodshow.com/

 

What’s your favourite Gardening Podcast and are there any more UK-based shows you would recommend?

Project for 2018 – The Great Tomato Challenge

Project for 2018: The Great Tomato Challenge. Tomato, Tomatoes, Grow Your Own, edible, allotment, allotment blog, allotment life, allotments, home grown, tomato growing, grow your own veg, grow your own vegetables, GYO, harvest, Craig LeHoullier, epic tomatoes,

My hunt for some reliable outdoor tomatoes begins – The Great Tomato Challenge 2018

So why The Great Tomato Challenge? I’ve had a few goes at getting some tomatoes from the plants in my little greenhouse but they’ve been much the embarrassment. The plants seem healthy but fruit-set can be poor, the fruit takes ages to ripen and mostly they’ll succumb to either blight or rot before a harvest can be had.

I’ve decided that 2018 is the year of the tomato. Now I have an allotment, with its availability of good light levels and space, I can indulge myself. I’ve tried growing challenges before (see the disaster that was my Chilli Challenge in 2014) so expectations need to be reasonable.

The goal is to find some varieties that can perform outside in the mild climate of Devon. I’m looking for a cherry tomato, a good salad tomato, and a good tomato for sauces. I’ll be judging them based on plant vigour/health, crop weight, and flavour.

The inspiration

I’ve been listening to the Still Growing Podcast this year and Jennifer (over at 6 Foot Mama) interviewed Craig Le Houllier who has grown hundreds of tomatoes as part of his obsession with heirloom varieties.

His book gave me huge amounts of information and a wish-list that neared on three figures for a while. After my initial excitement was tempered by the reality of the space available, and the desire to grow something other than tomatoes on the allotment, I managed to be more discerning and narrow the list down. Once I found a seed supplier in the UK that stocked a large amount of the list I was sorted.

I looked at Real Seeds as usual but the varieties weren’t part of their (excellent) collection.  Plant World Seeds are based just 10 minutes away from me and listed a large number of the varieties on my list.

The Varieties

  • Brandywine Red
  • Brandywine Yellow
  • Giant Syrian
  • Mortgage Lifter
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Kellog’s Breakfast
  • Black Krim
  • Orange Banana
  • Coyote
  • Mexico Midget
  • San Marzano
  • Black Cherry

I’ll probably sow these in February to give them the longest growing season possible. I best get some pots cleaned ready for the challenge.

2017 – A year in review in the garden and on the allotment

2017

As 2017 comes to an end it’s an appropriate time to review some of the progress that’s taken place at home and at the allotment.

2017 was a year of transition for us. The largest thing has been the addition of a daughter to our family. With this comes the juggling of priorities and trying to fit her into our lives. The second thing was returning back to the UK and getting reacquainted with the garden. The other new addition to life has been my new allotment.

It’s been a busy year looking back!

Mum’s Garden

Before I got my hands on the allotment plot and the keys back to our cottage I entertained myself by doing a re-design of a shady corner of mum’s garden.

From dark and shady with uneven crazy paving, 3 level changes, and a large useless garden store, to a calm, bright and, most importantly, green courtyard. The lush evergreen planting has performed well all year and is still looking good.

Allotment

The allotment started out as a patch of grass 10m by 10m. After lots of hard work, it’s now beds and borders and has given a great first-year harvest.

No Dig Bed

I tried something new at the allotment. Never one to shy away from warts and all approach to blogging here’s the biggest let down of the year.

My no dig bed experiment didn’t quite go to plan. I don’t think I had enough organic matter on top of the ground to smother the perennial weeds. Ah well, you live and learn.

Front Borders

The planters at the front of the cottage were weedy when we moved back in. The sad looking clematis has been replaced by another metal planter and a climbing rose. The planters have been rejigged with some more grasses and they’re still looking good at the end of December.

In the Garden

When we got back to our cottage the top garden was mostly covered with weeds. I cleared them out and it’s still looking a little bare. The plan for 2018is to start reintroducing some interesting planting here.

Garden Visits

We’ve had a great year exploring some open gardens

Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens

Eden Project

Sussex Prairie Garden

Gardens by the bay, Singapore

 

Thank you to everyone who read and comment on my blog, Twitter and Instagram feeds.

Happy New Year!

 

Six on Saturday – 16th December 2017

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.

Joining in with this popular garden bloggers meme

After two weeks of cheating a little on this Six on Saturday meme, firstly showing images from a nearby woodland and then last week picking the best of someone else’s garden, this time around I’ve picked some highlights from my garden.

When the light levels are low, and most of the perennial plants have dived under the soil to wait out winter’s worst, evergreen plants carry interest through undeterred. We didn’t have any of the recent snow this far into the South West so the garden is unscathed.

The Six on Saturday meme was started by The Propagator and you can find links to other garden bloggers taking part in the comments on his weekly posts.

ONE

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Primrose

This little Primrose was rudely lifted some time ago and dumped into a terracotta pot to be sorted later. Later hasn’t arrived so it’s still in there but doesn’t seem to mind and has started to flower. One day I’ll divide it and find room for it somewhere in the garden. In the meantime, I’ll just enjoy the flowers.

TWO

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Holly

This is one of the poor Holly bushes that have been languishing in containers for over 5 years. Whilst they have always formed plenty of berries, they never grew well, putting on only minimal growth.

When we were in Australia mum fostered them and duly doted on them with water and feed with very little in return. Only when the metal containers had rusted through and they needed repotting did I realise my mistake – they were still in their 2L plastic pots!!

I must have been planting them after a night shift.

THREE

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Tellima grandiflora

This easy to overlook woodland perennial is one of my favourite plants. It’s evergreen, has soft leaves and sends up delicate spikes of bell-shaped flowers that are fringed with pink. It’s also easy to start from seed and that’s where all of my plants have come from.

I’ve put a mental note to gather some seed in 2018 and start some more.

FOUR

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Helleborus foetidus

A horrible name for a very good plant. I like the evergreen foliage mostly. The flowers which are starting to perform now are just an added extra. Again, this tolerates low light levels well and earns its space in a shady garden.

FIVE

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Variegated bamboo

I’m a bit indifferent to bamboos. I have Phyllostachys nigra in a large container which has never delivered on its promise. Mostly they can be thugs but this shorter variegate variety was in the cottage when we moved here and hasn’t really spread. It adds a brighter element to a dark dry corner

SIX

Six on Saturday 16th December 2017. Plants, plant, garden, gardens, tree, trees, euonymus europaeus, spindle, spindle tree, maple, field maple, umbellifer, winter, woodland, woods, garden blog, garden blog meme, primrose, evergreen, holly, tellima, hellebore, helleborus, helleborus foetidus, bamboo, grasses.
Grass display at the front of the cottage

The cattle feed troughs at the front of the cottage have done really well after their revamp this year. Even into December, they are full of texture and interest. When the low light catches the inflorescences it looks great. They have required no attention since planting.

The planting is a mixture of Stipa tenuissima, Calamagrostis × acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’, a small leaved Hebe plants grown from cuttings, Euphorbia myrsinites. There are tulips newly planted ready to put on some spring colour.

 

 

 

 

So that’s my first Six on Saturday. Please join in to mark the changes in your garden over the year.

Six on Saturday: 9th December 2017

Six snapshots in the garden to chart the changing seasons

Last weeks Six on Saturday went quite well so I’ve decided to give it another go this week. I’m away from the house so it’s another cheat week from me. The weather has turned chilly and we’re staying at the in-laws’ house in Surrey. The frost in the garden here was too much of a novelty for me so I thought I’d share.

The Six on Saturday meme was started by The Propagator so go and take a look at his weekly post. Also look through the comments to find more blogs joining in.

ONE

This Winter Jasmine putting in a good show this time of year but I doubt I’ll ever covet it for my own garden. I find the growth habit odd and for most of the year it’s just wiry stems.

TWO

Seed heads of Japanese Anemone. This is a lesson in not clearing away your perennials once they’ve gone to sleep for winter – look what you’ll miss out on!

THREE

The same goes for Hydrangeas. Leaving the spent flower heads is supposed to provide some cover against frost but more importantly it keeps interest into the depths of winter.

FOUR

Frost covered acorns and their husks.

FIVE

This Azalea is another plant that I probably won’t plant myself but the foliage at this time of year has great colour and the frosting looks great.

SIX

Well it is nearly Christmas! I’m getting more interested in conifers and the like. The pale blue needles on this Pine match the chilly morning air. After my morning promenade around the garden my coffee had gone cold and my fingers had chilled. Enjoy the frosty weekend.

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